“The Farewell” and a Personal Story of Dual Identity

By Sanai Rashid On the one day during PBA week when I had no tests scheduled, I leaped at the opportunity to indulge in movies at home. After scrolling endlessly through Netflix titles that did not excite me, I thought back to a movie I wanted to see over the summer, The Farewell, directed by…

Lessons from Participating in the 2020 Iowa Caucuses

Written and Photographed By Adrian Flynn The 2020 Iowa Caucuses marked both the beginning of a tumultuous primary season and also possibly the end of the caucus system as we know it. The release of vote totals was delayed not only due to a reporting app that experienced technical problems, but also to the Iowa…

The Many Sides of Mr. August

By Tali Lebowitsch Photos By Adrian Flynn His name may sound familiar from the countless emails you received in your inbox at the beginning of the year. He may have been the one who saved you from taking that A.P. physics class you knew you couldn’t handle, or transferred you into the art class you…

How Our Society Deals with Sex Abuse and Why it’s All Wrong

By Daniel Arturi In a world plagued by so many pressing issues it can sometimes be difficult to retain compassion for each individual issue. However, the sexual abuse of minors is worth everyone’s rapt attention and absolute empathy. I myself have a very personal relationship with this issue, as I live a sliver of a…

An Analysis of Sports Pages and The New York Times

By Samuel Bovitz When I first moved to New York City, I was a kid accustomed to reading the LA Times sports page. It was so well done. Bill Plaschke led a crew of great sportswriters, and I slowly started to compile a list in my head of what makes a great sports page or…

A Closer Look at the SHSAT: How it Helps and Hurts NYC Students

By Tali Lebowitsch This year only seven out of eight hundred and ninety five seats were offered to black students to attend Stuyvesant High School, a specialized high school in New York City. Out of the other seven specialized high schools in the city, only ten percent of the student body consists of Black and…

Schooling Ourselves on Climate Change

By Tali Rosen On Friday, September 20th, students at schools in New York City and around the world walked out of classes to take a stand against climate change. The Beacon School, in addition to supporting and facilitating the student walk out, dedicated itself to the fight against climate change by replacing the morning’s regular…